casebooknewbury

If your a fan of Steampunk genre novels, or maybe even a A.C. Doyle era mystery lover, then you’re going to want to get your dirigible loving hands on George Mann’s latest collection of short stories featuring gentleman investigator, Sir Maurice Newbury, and his tenacious assistant, Miss Veronica Hobbes! Published by Titan Books, the Casebook of Newbury and Hobbes is an early 20th century collection of spooky tails, weird technology, and (of course) murders! Here’s the synopsis:

A collection of short stories detailing the supernatural steampunk adventures of detective duo, Sir Maurice Newbury and Miss Veronica Hobbes in dark and dangerous Victorian London. Along with Chief Inspector Bainbridge, Newbury & Hobbes will face plague revenants, murderous peers, mechanical beasts, tentacled leviathans, reanimated pygmies, and an encounter with Sherlock Holmes.

The stories featured in this collection of tales take place between the already published adventures of Sir Newbury and Miss Hobbes, (a time line is included in the book) and it is an excellent introduction to their steam powered world as well as Mann’s vivid style of writing. George Mann has a unique talent for writing the late 19th/ early 20th century and his characters (though some what reminiscent of A.C. Doyle’s Holmes, Watson, and Lestrade) make for a fun read. Though the book is full of fantastic ideas and bizarre technology it is somewhat lite on the “mystery” side of story telling. In some of the chapters, Sir Newbury, has to do little more than show up and the case is revealed with very little amount of deduction. However, the book is full of adventure and oddities, and combined with a short story told through the voice of Doctor Watson, readers of this genre should enthusiastically enjoy this book and, hopefully, many more of Mann’s adventures of the turn of the century. Well, century before last, that is…

The Casebook of Newbury & Hobbes can be found in all major book stores or online at the Titan Books Web site!

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks