Tag: fiction (page 1 of 2)

The Vinyl Detective – The Run-Out Groove

An Atomic Moo Book Review!

Alright, El Moochadores! It’s the holiday weekend, and I’ve done some summer read’n. So, let’s kick today off with a couple of Atomic Moo Book Reviews courtesy of the good peoples over (yonder?) at Titan Books.

First up is a book I enjoyed the hell out of. figuratively speaking (of course), but I really enjoyed the first Vinyl Detective novel by author Andrew Cartmel and I was stoked to get to review the sequel. Though my opinion of hipsters is still pretty negative (what with their crusty beards and thick framed glasses), Cartmel’s mysteries are uniquely quirky and deeply engaging. In The Run-Out Groove The Vinyl Detective is back to suss out what happened to the lost child of a dead 1960’s rock icon. Here’s a the proper synopsis:

His first adventure consisted of the search for a rare record; his second the search for a lost child. Specifically the child of Valerian, lead singer of a great rock band of the 1960s, who hanged herself in mysterious circumstances after the boy’s abduction.

Along the way, the Vinyl Detective finds himself marked for death, at the wrong end of a shotgun, and unknowingly dosed with LSD as a prelude to being burned alive. And then there’s the grave robbing…

The mystery Cartmel lays out has a great mix of humor and danger that just sucks readers in. I think I finished this book in a day or two, and that was during a heavy work week. Though the Run-Out Groove has a similar beat to the first Vinyl Detective novel, this is very much its own story and readers who may have missed the first book won’t be left behind. I thought there was something very satisfying in reading the exploits of music geeks who find themselves in danger while uncovering a fifty year old mystery. Cartmel also does a brilliant job of writing outlandish characters, that can be humorous and deadly, but not cliches or tropes. Death to all hipsters, but not before another Vinyl Detective novel.

The Vinyl Detective: the Run-Out Groove can be found in all major bookstores, or you can get your copy online at Titanbooks.com.

Cheers.

Escapology!

An a Atomic Moo Book Review!

Okay El Moochadores, I’m back to review another Titan Books classic. Well, new classic. Actually, it’s not that new. Titan sent me this book sometime ago to review, and I just recently finished it. d’oh. No disrespect to Titan Books, just my crappy life takes some maneuvering. And speaking of crappy lives: Let’s talk about Shock Pao! First, here’s a proper synopsis:

Shock Pao is not just any Haunt—he’s the best. There isn’t a system that he can’t crack into, no virtual lock he can’t pick, nothing he can’t steal for the right price. Outside virtual world the Slip, though, he’s a Fail—no degree, no job, no affiliations to protect him from angry ex-customers. Of which he has quite a few. So when his ex brings Shock a job which could help him escape his miserable existence, he accepts, little realizing that it will turn out to be his most impossible, illegal and incredible assignment yet.

Amiga works for Twist Calhoun, one of the toughest crime lords in the Gung, as a Cleaner—assassin. Trapped in a world of kill-or-be-killed, she wants out. But when Shock’s war comes to her, she doesn’t have a choice: it’s her job to bring him to Twist, dead or alive—or it’ll be her head in a bag in Twist’s vault.

Escapology really reminded me of mid-1990’s science fiction. Movies like Johnny Mnemonic, Virtuosity, (maybe) Hackers, or any thing else from that time that tried to cram young-ish punks, dystopian futures, and a crazy version of “future internet” into one story. I do (actually) dig those kind of stories, I can’t argue that they are any good, and the same goes for Escapology. Though Warom’s story starts out great with the introduction of (what I’m guessing is) a future hacker who also has massive self esteem/drug abuse problems, the story quickly starts to serve up a series of “what the fuck” moments.

There’s no real order to my list of gripes with Escapology, so this is going to be a ramble. Starting with: The world has been shattered, and now has giant floating land ships and pirates, but somehow kept, major cities, the internet (Future Internet!), and self abusing teenagers. Then (Spoilers!!!), somehow holograms from the unreal world can leap out of Shock’s eyes and start killing the really real people, even though they are holograms. Made of light. Then there is the inclusion of the now almost standard issue (for every fucking story now… go social justice!) female bad ass, Amiga. It seems in 2017 you can’t create a story with out including a little ninja chick to prove equality among the sexes. Which sucks, because Shock was already this interesting character stocked with tons of diversity, and “fuck the norm” attitude, that deserved way more attention than weird future sailors, and off the shelf feminism complete with a crossbow. Finally (again Spoilers!!!), there’s the big rally at the end of the story where all the groups come together to take down the big baddies. Just like in the 90’s future internet stories I mentioned before! Well, except virtuosity. Denzel mostly just outwits Russel Crowe, but it’s still worth a watch! Seriously, Crowe eats glass, Denzel get’s his arm blown off, and the world is denied easy made robo-whores in the worst way possible! Vituosity rocks!!! Wait… where was I?

Despite all of this; I still think Warom is a great writer, and has a lot of potential for future stories. Sure, I felt like Escapology “face plants” a bit, but it also demonstrates a ton of imagination for both character development and world building. Shock Pao by himself is a great read. As well as his interactions with his ex-lovers and past experiences. I feel it is a bit unfortunate more attention wasn’t paid to Shock and his problems. Instead, a shark jumped out of his face. Okay, I’m still a bit bugged by that one. Though if the story had been called “boy who shoots killer sharks out of his eyes” I would have loved it from the beginning, because I was expecting a kid who… yeah you get it.

I do have a copy of the second novel in the series, Virology, and I’m hoping some of the stuff like people eating holo-sharks, will be explained. You can get your own copy of Escapology at every major book seller, or online now at Titan Books. Now, everybody writing science fiction go rent (fuck, I am old…) download, or, stream Hackers and Johnny Mnemonic and then don’t do any of that in your story!

The High Ground

An Atomic Moo Book Review

Way back in 2016 (if I can remember that far back) Titan Books sent me a pile of novels and “art of books” to review here on the Moo (heh). Anyways, 2016 was also a very tough year chuck full of scary personal problems. Notice how there hasn’t been a Moocast in a while? Well, probably not, but in the history of my life 2016 will go down as “not fun”, and that is despite going to comic book conventions as a vendor for the first time and kicking off both Atomic Moo #1 and Atomic Tails! However, things are getting a little better, and this pile of books sitting atop my Con Pile, is getting really annoying. Like a sort of silent guilt trip. Yeah, I took the books, I should read and review them. Which I’ve started to do again. Also, there’s a lot of creativity in these books, and we’re a geek creative website. It is very important to me to figure out how to be a creative professional, and peeking into the imagination of authors and artists I think can help. So, we’re back with another Atomic Moo Book Review! Better late then never, right?

First up is a paperback novel by writer Melinda Snoodgrass, a veteran SF and fantasy writer who has written for Star Trek, and worked with George (where’s the new damn book?) R. R. Martin. Keen.

The High Ground: Imperials Saga is a military SF novel set in a future galaxy conquered by humans and ruled by a mostly chauvinistic society. The story kicks off when, in a move to preserve power, the emperor’s daughter (Mercedes) becomes the first woman admitted to High Ground – an elite orbital military school. There she meets the son of a tailor (Tracy) who, despite his poor background, has won a scholar ship to the academy and hopes to one day rise above his “intitulado” (untitled) station in life. Then there’s some romance, political backstabbing, and all the cool stuff that goes along with alien subjugation, class warfare, and sexism. Keen.

For the most part, I did enjoy this book. Snodgrass creates an interesting future where humans have conquered a galaxy, yet (somehow) also reverted to an imperial government controlled by a patriotic aristocracy. Way back when I was napping through college I remember one of my anthropology professors discussing similar situations in world history. The idea being that as humanity has room to expand, and possibly compete with others, non-reproductive activity and rights take a back seat to baby making. In High Ground, Snodgrass presents a story where humans are desperate to fill planets with more humans so the rights of women and homosexuals take a backseat. I’m not saying I agree with this, but unconscious social decisions have always fascinated me. Like, cars. How the fuck did we all agree the car was a good idea. It sucks. It “Force Awakens” sucks, but somehow we all go along with it and spend way too much time starring at the ass end of a SUV with “Trump” bumper stickers all over the back of it! Digression aside, I also enjoyed how the current ruling families of her book evolved from the capitalism of today. The idea of Pepsi, McDonalds, and (gods helps us) Disney going on one day to spawn a ruling class of oligarchs, is really interesting. Also, this is a very feminist book. As a fully equipped dude, I think this should have bugged me a little more, but it didn’t. I think Snodgrass did a good job of introducing a bit of feminism into a military SF book without scaring guys away.

As far as criticisms of this novel go: I don’t think I dug the teen romance aspects of the book. Not that it wasn’t written well, or that others wouldn’t enjoy it, but I’m way past my teen years, and the “space high school” romances, and competitions, were tough for me to care about. My only other criticism would be that the book (mostly) sticks with the perspectives of Tracy and Mercedes, which gets claustrophobic at times. In a reading sense. Getting away from the protagonist and into the heads of some of the other characters would’ve been a nice trip at times.

So that’s the review El Moochadores! If you’re interested in checking out The High Ground you can currently find it in most bookstores or you can get your own copy online at Titan Books!

Cheers!

The Age of Treachery!

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An Atomic Moo Book Review!

Okay, I’ve been trying to get this review done for about two weeks, but life just keeps getting in the way. So, I’m just going to start typing, and hopefully somewhere in the blathering that follows will at least pieces of a meaningful review. Here goes…

Gavin Scott’s Age of Treachery is an extremely entertaining suspense novel set in post World War II London. The story follows history professor Duncan Forrester, who has to prove that a friend did not commit the murder of a rival colleague in his history department. Trying to prove who murdered David Lyall is really tough though, because every one hated the man. Seeking the murderer takes Forrester across all of northern Europe and to some pretty fantastic encounters with some of the 20th century’s best fiction writers!

Usually, I don’t pick up mystery novels. So, I am a little grateful to Titan Books for introducing me to the genre and getting me this book to review. It kind of made up (a bit) for all the schlock entertainment flooding our televisions and movie theaters these days, and shows what a true art writing can be. I don’t know how a person even starts to write a mystery, but (by what ever method) Scott created a suspense filled story that was also thrilling and fun to read. The book takes a deep dive into post world war II history, and keeps a very “English/Sherlock Holmes” manner in its narrative. Which added a lot of charm to the story. I don’t think this will go down as one of the best mystery novels ever, but it definitely deserves a lot of credit for its unique mystery and incredible use of historical events (and literary assets like J.R.R. Tolkien) of the time. This is honestly one of the few novels where I don’t have any criticism after having read it. It was an intriguing, memorable, page turner. I was so into the book that I finished it in two days and I’m looking forward to future adventures of Duncan Forrester.

The Age of Treachery is available in all major book stores or you can get your copy online at Titanbooks.com!

It is the winter of 1946, and after years of war, ex-Special Operations Executive agent Duncan Forrester is back at his Oxford college as a junior Ancient History Fellow. But his peace is shattered when a hated colleague is found dead: stabbed and pushed from an upper window.
One of Forrester’s closest friends is arrested for the murder, but Forrester is not convinced of his guilt; the dead man had many enemies, and there are rumours that he was in possession of a mysterious Viking manuscript. A manuscript that may have been owned by a German spy…
Travelling from Oxford to bombed-out Berlin and to the fjords of Norway in his search for the truth, Forrester must use all his wartime skills to find the true killer.

Dead Letters!

DeadLetters

An Anthology of the Undelivered, The Missing, The Returned…

An Atomic Moo Book Review

The Dead Letter office is a real thing. According to Wikipedia (never a real source), the dead letter office is “is a facility within a postal system where un-deliverable mail is dealt with”. A lot of countries have dead letter offices, but I think the US is the only one to actually use the name. According to 99percentinvisible.com – over “90,000,000 items were marked undeliverable-as-addressed (UAA) and entered the dead letter and parcel system.” This is all really cool, and (of course) it is also the prefect premise for dozens of stories the likes of which can be found in a new anthology from Titan Books! See how I brought that around. I think I’m good at this…

Anyways… Now out through Titan Books is a fantastic new collection of stories centered around the (mostly) sinister idea of unwanted mail! Okay… on the surface you wouldn’t think that was such a scary idea, but think about it: The wrong addressed letter, the misplaced package, that message that just disappeared, represent an idea of mystery. Opening a strangers mail is like a starting off point to the unknown! A possible leap into an unknown mystery! The shadowy secrets of your apartments former resident’s credit history suddenly laid bare! It’s possibly a goddamn ticket to the Twilight Zone, people!

Exploring the vast ocean possibly within 90 + million undelivered messages are eighteen writers (list below) who contribute their literary talents to this idea. Now I don’t want to give the idea that Dead Letters is all spooky horror stuff. The variety of stories cover everything from horror to mystery to the kind of mundane. One of my favorite stories in the book is actually one of the first stories and deals with a mysterious green envelope. Not necessarily an evil green letter (could be), but definitely a very bizarre green letter. Then other stories take you through painful personal histories or to mythical places. It’s this variety of ideas all based on the one premise that makes this book a fun read. There’s even an H.P. Lovecraft-esque story by Andrew Lane that reads incredibly spooky, and I think would have made Lovecraft proud. Overall, I really dug this book. Though, I thought it was weird every person in the story had a moral dilemma about opening a piece of lost mail (really? Not one guy/gal was like, “free shit!”), all of the stories take an unexpected journey and some of them are even kind of touching. I think this would be a much better book to read in the fall, closer to Halloween, but if you’re looking for an overall eerie vibe in your summer reading, then The Dead Letters would be a great place to start!

Dead Letters is available now in all major book stores, or you can get your copy online at Titanbooks.com. I posted the official synopsis below along with a complete list of contributing authors.

The Dead Letters Office: the final repository of the undelivered. Love missives unread, gifts unreceived, lost in postal limbo. Dead Letters: An Anthology features new stories from the masters of horror, fantasy and speculative fiction, each inspired by an inhabitant of the Dead Letters Office, including tales from Joanne Harris, China Miéville & Maria Dahvana Headley, Adam LG Nevill and Michael Marshall Smith.

Conrad Williams , Joanne Harris , Michael Marshall Smith , China Miéville , Nicholas Royle , Ramsey Campbell , Pat Cadigan , Nina Allan , Angela Slatter , Alison Moore , Kirsten Kaschock , Maria Dahvana Headley , Steven Hall , Lisa Tuttle , Muriel Gray , Claire Dean , Christopher Fowler , Adam LG Nevill , Andrew Lane

The Nice Guys

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An Atomic Moo Book Review of the official movie novel!


Titan Books sent me a review copy of The Nice Guys, and I really wanted to get the review done before this film hit theaters. However, at the time I was slammed with work stuff, and getting us ready for our first comic book convention. So, it was really cool when my twin brother (Chudd) said that he would read the book and write the review. Awesome, I thought. Then some time passed, and no review. Then more time passed, and still no review. Then way too much time passed and I asked Chudd about the book. “Oh yeah,” he said. “It was good.” “Okay,” I said. “Can you put that in writing?” An hour later I came back to my desk where I found a very “abused” paperback and a piece of paper that read: “it was good.”


Fuck.

So, I started to read the book, but the novel was warped and distorted. So, being a little curious I asked Chudd what had happened. “Oh yeah. It got wet,” he said.
“Did you drop in the sink,” I asked.
“No, just the toilet.”

Doubledamitfuck… So, yeah, it took awhile, but here’s my review:

The thing is, Chudd was right. This book was good. Really good. Written by Charles Ardai, The Nice Guys is a fun mystery set in 1970’s Los Angeles about two, somewhat less than bright, men on the trail of a missing girl. The story begins with Holland March. He’s a private investigator, and former cop, who is initially hired to find out if a porn star, who has been recently killed in a car accident, was actually still alive.The_Nice_Guys_square_grande March discovers that a girl named Amelia is how involved, but his investigation is cut short when Amelia hires professional thug, Jackson Healy, to beat up March and stop his snooping around. Then Amelia disappears and March and Healy go looking through a world of corrupt politicians, auto companies, and porn films, to find the missing girl.

If you haven’t already seen the movie, then go pick this book up. It’s fun, energetic, and full of likable characters all set in groovy 1970’s detective story. This is like Maltese Falcon with a pulse… and with somewhat less intelligent P.I.’s. Both the characters of March and Healy are so off the beaten path that their some what clueless way of getting things done kind of reminded me of the Big Lebowski. The mismatch pair bumble their way through the investigation and encounter some very “laugh out loud” moments. Which doesn’t often happen with a book. I don’t really have a lot of negative stuff to say about this story. It did it’s job and kept me entertained. If anything, I’m more stoked to see the movie now to see how it all plays out in real(-ish) life. Definitely add this one to your summer reading list and enjoy the ride. Also, since reading this book I’ve been listening to a steady stream of Earth Wind & Fire and KC and the Sunshine Band. groov’n.

The Good Guys can be found at all major book stores or you can get your own copy online at Titanbooks.com. Check out the official synopsis and trailer for the movie below!

The official novelization of the upcoming comedic detective thriller, The Nice Guys, starring Oscar Award Winner Russell Crowe, Oscar Award Nominee Ryan Gosling, Matt Bomer, and Oscar Award Winner Kim Basinger.

The film takes place in 1970s Los Angeles, when down-on-his-luck private eye Holland March (Ryan Gosling) and hired enforcer Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe) must work together to solve the case of a missing girl (Margaret Qualley) and the seemingly unrelated death of a porn star. During their investigation, they uncover a shocking conspiracy that reaches up to the highest circles of power.

THE NICE GUYS Trailer Red Band 2016 (NSFW)

Warcraft: Durotan

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An Atomic Moo Book Review of the Official Movie Prequel

I play a lot of WoW. Probably too much, but the point is, I’m a fan and I think it’s pretty awesome they just released of a Warcaft movie. I also think it’s pretty awesome that I get to review the official Prequel novel: Durotan! Damn. I love being a geek blogger.

Anyways, Durotan (named for the principal character and released by Titan Books) takes place before the first Warcarft game. Not the MMORPG, but the very first Warcarft. Which, I really want to play again – having read this book. The world of Draenor is falling apart. Literally, not figuratively._86564582_warcraft In these last days of a dying world, Durotan has taken over as chief of the Frostwolf clan of orcs, and now it’s up to him to not only lead his tribe, but save them from annihilation. Adding to his problems is the corruption of the spirits, murderous other orcs, and a creepy green orc named Gul’dan. Here’s the official synopsis:

In the world of Draenor, the strong and fiercely independent Frostwolf Clan are faced with increasingly harsh winters and thinning herds. When Gul’dan, a mysterious outsider, arrives in Frostfire Ridge offering word of new hunting lands, Durotan, the Clan’s chieftain, must make an impossible decision: Abandon the territory, pride and traditions of his people, or lead them into the unknown.

Part of me really enjoyed this novel. I’ve played WoW since 2008 (just about when Wrath of the Lich King released), but I never got into the lore of the story. Reading about the orcs, the Draenor (the blue space goats), and Gul’dan’s origin was interesting. In a way, it also covered the birth of Shamanism in the game, as well as Warlocks, and why the orcs game to Azeroth. However, I don’t see anyone who isn’t a Warcraft fan enjoying this book. The story is very “noble savage” and I think does a bad job of mixing the role of an honorable warrior with the idea of a blood thirsty killer. It’s like reading Kilgon fan fiction, but with talking blue space goats. Okay, that actually does sound better, but I still don’t like the idea of “everyone’s a good guy.” I think this story would have been a better read if it had just backed off the nobility and honor shtick. Let ’em be bad guys! Other than that one criticism, I did enjoy this book, and it even got me to roll a Shaman (I named him Ood. He’s a Tauren. Since starting Atomic Moo, I tend to play a lot of cow characters) which I’m having fun with. So, whether you’ve seen the movie or not, Durotan is actually a good introduction to Warcarft and something I think WoW fans will enjoy.

You can get you’re own copy of Warcarft: Durotan at book stores everywhere, or order your copy online at Titanbooks.com. For the Horde!

The Angel of Highgate

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An Atomic Moo Book Review of Vaughn Entwistle’s New Novel

This summer I turn 40. Four decades. Most of them kind of awful. Now that I’m about to hit the big Four Zero all I think about is death. Well, my death. I can’t help it! I’m probably more or less half way there and that scares the hell out of me! Hell, most cavemen only lived into their thirties! I’m a very old caveman, and there’s so much I haven’t done! I’ve only hit on about twenty strippers in my life. Do you know how many strippers are out there!? And, Thai food! I’ve never ate it! What if it’s awesome!? Oh, and I’ve never eaten Thai food off a stripper! Ye Gods, there so much I haven’t done! I’m not ready to die!!! So, picking up a novel that has a fascination with death, dying, and the dead, probably wasn’t smart.

Anyways, my own mortality aside: Titan Books recently published a thrilling new novel from Vaughn Entwistle (cool last name) that is very much on the macabre side of 19th century London. The Angel of Highgate begins with Lord Geoffrey Thraxton, a sort of outlandish rogue, who’s self indulgent behavior has given him a bad reputation in elite English society. Thraxton is obsessed with death, and one evening while hanging around a cemetery he sees a specter that changes his life! Here’s the official synopsis:

After surviving a pistol duel, Thraxton boasts his contempt for death and insults the attending physician. It is a mistake he will regret, for Silas Garretteis a deranged sociopath and chloroform-addict whose mind was broken on the battlefields of Crimea. When Thraxton falls in love with a mysterious woman who haunts Highgate Cemetery by night, he unwittingly provides the murderous doctor with the perfect means to punish a man with no fear of death.

The Angel of Highgate did an excellent job of recreating 19th century macabre. This book is as thrilling as any horror fiction you could get from Poe or Shelly two centuries ago. Lord Thraxton is enough of a young, egocentric, cad to be both enjoyable and hated at the same time. I also really enjoyed the villains in this story. Good bad guys are hard to come by, and Entwistle did a masterful job of writing the antagonists for this novel. Doctor Garrette, and Morecai Fowler, are a great combination of ruthless and sinister for a more adult oriented story. If I had to give a criticism of this book it would be that I wish it had kept up with the “spookiness” that was present in the first half of the novel. Though the story remained dark and eerie, it became much more of an adventure story and pulled away from the supernatural tone that was set up by moments like the seance in chapter twelve. That didn’t ruin the book for me, I was just hoping for a bit more of a ghost story after the seance, is all.

So, if you’re young and you’ve got a whole life a head of you, yeah, pick this novel up and give it a read. Now you’ll have to excuse me while I go find a happy stripper that’ll let me slurp Pad Thai off her naked body. I might not get to do it tomorrow!!!

The Angel of Highgate is for sale in all major bookstores, or you can get your copy online from Titan Books!

Cheers!

Bookies!

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New Literary Fiction Review Podcast from Sir Brandon Noel

Episode 2

Okay El Moochadores, it’s a beautiful Thursday here in sunny San Diego, and I’m just feeling good. So, let’s keep the good vibes going with some geeky book talk. One of our Brethren Moo, Brandon Noel of Destiny Comix has kicked off a new podcast called Bookies and we’re featuring the second episode here. On Bookies, Brandon gathers a small group to discuss… well books.OddThomas Yeah, I know you got there way ahead of me. Anyways, click the link below to listen to their book club like discussion of Odd Thomas by Dean Koontz. “Koontz”. ‘kind of want to just keeping saying that. “Koontz”. Anyways, hit the link below to listen to episode #2 and we’ll feature more Bookies podcast as they’re released.

Enjoy! (“Koontz”)

The dead don’t talk. I don’t know why.” But they do try to communicate, with a short-order cook in a small desert town serving as their reluctant confidant. Odd Thomas thinks of himself as an ordinary guy, if possessed of a certain measure of talent at the Pico Mundo Grill and rapturously in love with the most beautiful girl in the world, Stormy Llewellyn

Bookies Podcast

Dust and Desire: A Joel Sorrell Novel

Dust and Desire Cover

An Atomic Moo Book Review of Conrad Williams Novel

I’m sure this isn’t true for the vast majority of mystery stories out on book shelves, but it seems like most of the ones I’ve read (and I like mysteries) tend to center around a detective who’s life is complete shit. The protagonist, sometimes including modern interpretations of Sherlock Holmes, are often surly, anti-social, drug addled, dicks (P.I.’s) working on the fringes of law and order. Who also despite being barely sober, somehow manage to put together all the pieces of a dangerous whodunit. Yeah, pretty much what happens in Conrad William’s novel, Dust and Desire, but this time with way more drinking. Keen.

Dust and Desire pits a broken ex-cop turned PI (Sorrell) against a ruthless serial killer and it doesn’t help that this psycho is also coming after Sorrell and everyone he knows. Here’s the official synopsis:

The Four-Year-Old, an extraordinary killer, has arrived in London, hell-bent on destruction… PI Joel Sorrell is approached by the mysterious Kara Geenan, who is desperate to find her missing brother. Joel takes on the case but almost immediately, an attempt is made on his life. The body count increases. And then Kara vanishes too… as those close to Joel are sucked into his nightmare, he realizes he must track down the killer if he is to halt a grisly masterplan – even if it means sacrificing his own life.

Though I’m skeptical that any human being could function after the massive volumes of alcohol Sorrell imbibes, let alone stop a killer, I enjoyed this story. Dust and Desire is chuck full of dark humor and even darker action. Sorrell’s messy past adds a fantastic backdrop to his investigation, and reading about a detective that is almost universally hated is always a lot of fun. Though readers should be warned this book is amazingly English. I mean – it doesn’t shy away from a very U.K. based (I want to say cockney, but I don’t know…) narrative and metaphors that I’m sure make sense in London (maybe) but there were several times where I had to do my own “google” investigations just to figure out what the hell Sorrell had just said. However, this could also be interpreted as just part of the books charm, and we all walk away with a few new terms for being drunk. Also, Dust and Desires readers can look forward to an additional (exclusive) short story, Do Not Resuscitate, and an author Q&A.

Dust and Desire is available now at most major book sellers, or you can get your copy online at Titanbooks.com.

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